Tag Archives: worked

Google to unveil post-Chronicle cloud cybersecurity plans

Google is set to reveal how cloud cybersecurity technologies developed by Chronicle have been worked into its portfolio for large enterprise customers.

In June, Google Cloud announced it had acquired Chronicle, a startup launched within parent company Alphabet in 2015. Integration work has proceeded since then, and details will be shared at the Cloud Next ’19 UK conference, which begins in London on Nov. 20.

A recent report on Chronicle from Vice’s Motherboard publication painted a bleak picture of the company post-Google acquisition, with key executives including its founder and CEO departing, and dismal morale in the product-development trenches.

“People keep quitting. Sales doesn’t know what to do, since there’s no real product roadmap anymore. Engineering is depressed for the same reason,” an unnamed Chronicle employee told the site.

Asked for comment, a Google spokeswoman pointed to the company’s blog post on the upcoming announcements at Cloud Next UK, and did not address the claims of unrest at Chronicle.

Google plans to announce “multiple new native capabilities” for security, as well as planned new features for Backstory, Chronicle’s main cloud cybersecurity product, according to the blog.

Backstory can ingest massive amounts of security telemetry data and process it for insights. It is geared toward companies that have a wealth of this information but lack the staff or resources to analyze it in-house.

Customers upload their telemetry data to a private repository on Google Cloud infrastructure, where it is indexed and analyzed by Chronicle’s software engine. The engine compares the customer’s data against threat intelligence signals mined from many sources and looks for problematic correlations.

Backstory will compete with both on-premises security information and event management platforms and cloud cybersecurity systems, such as Sumo Logic and Splunk. Rival cloud providers have responded as well, with one prominent case being Azure Sentinel, which Microsoft launched this year.

Beyond performance and results, pricing may be a key factor for Backstory. Chronicle has made much of the fact that it won’t be priced according to data volume, but the exact nature of the business model still isn’t clear. Microsoft uses a tiered, fixed-fee pricing scheme for Azure Sentinel based on daily data capacity.

Backstory’s biggest opportunity may be outside Google Cloud

Jon OltsikJon Oltsik

While Chronicle’s staff would have enjoyed more freedom if kept independent from Google Cloud, there’s no evidence to suggest it’s being held back at this point, according to Jon Oltsik, senior principal analyst for cybersecurity at Enterprise Strategy Group.

The Google Cloud management team needs to give Chronicle the latitude to innovate and compete.
Jon OltsikSenior principal analyst, cybersecurity, Enterprise Strategy Group

“The Google Cloud management team needs to give Chronicle the latitude to innovate and compete against a strong and dynamic market,” he said. “This should be the model moving forward and I’ll be monitoring how it proceeds.”

There is an emerging market for specific security analytics and operations tools for monitoring the security of cloud-based workloads, which aligns well with Google Cloud, Oltsik added. But the bigger opportunity lies with customers who aren’t necessarily Google Cloud users, he added.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Oracle applications development EVP on Fusion, SaaS and what’s ahead

SAN FRANCISCO — Oracle executive vice president Steve Miranda has worked at the company since 1992 and leads all application development at the vendor. He was there well before Oracle made its acquisition-driven push against application rival SAP in the mid-2000s, with the purchases of PeopleSoft and Siebel.

In 2007, Oracle put Miranda in charge of Fusion Applications, the next-generation software suite that took a superset of earlier application functionality, added a modern user experience and embedded analytics, and offered both on-premises and cloud deployments. Fusion Applications became generally available in 2011, and since then the Oracle has continued to flesh out its portfolio with acquisitions and in-house development.

Of the three main flavors of cloud computing, SaaS has been by far the most successful for Oracle applications, as it draws in previously on-premises workloads and attracts new customers. The competition remains fierce, with Oracle jockeying not only with longtime rival SAP but also the likes of Salesforce and Workday.

Miranda spoke to TechTarget at Oracle’s OpenWorld conference in a conversation that covered Fusion’s legacy, the success of SaaS deployments compared with on-premises ones, Oracle’s app acquisitions of late and the road ahead.

Software project cost overruns and outright failures have been an unfortunate staple of the on-premises world. The same hasn’t happened in SaaS. Part of this is because SaaS is vendor-managed from the start, but issues like change management and training are still risk factors in the cloud. Explain what’s happening from your perspective.

We have a reasonably good track record, even in the on-premises days. The noticeable difference I’ve seen [with cloud] is as follows:

In on-premise, because you had a set version, and because you knew you’re going to move for years, you started the implementation, but you had to have everything, because there wasn’t another version coming [soon].

Now, inevitably, that meant it took a while. And then what that meant is your business sometimes changed. New requirements came in. That meant you had to change configuration, or buy a third-party [product] or customize. That meant the implementation pushed out. But [initially], you had this sort of one-time cliff, where you had to go or no-go. Because you weren’t going to touch the system, forever more, because that was sort of the way it was. Or maybe you look at years later. It put a tremendous amount of pressure [on customers].

Steve Miranda, executive vice president of applications,Oracle
Steve Miranda, executive vice president of Oracle applicationsdevelopment, addresses attendees Oracle OpenWorld last week.

So what happened was, while companies tried to control scope, because there wasn’t a second phase, or the second phase was way out, it was really hard to control scope.

In SaaS, the biggest shift that I’ve seen from customers is that mentality is all different, given that they know, by the nature of the product we’ve built, they’re going to get regular updates. Their mindset is “OK, we’re going to take advantage of new features. We’re going to continue more continually change our development process or our business process.”

Do last-minute things pop up? Sure. Do project difficulties pop up? Sure. But [you need] the willingness to say, “You know what? We’re going to keep phase one, the date’s not moving, which means your cost doesn’t move.”

In SaaS, projects aren’t perfect, sometimes there’s [a scope issue], but you have something live. You get some payback, and there’s some kind of finish line for that. That’s the biggest difference that I’ve seen.

The Fusion Applications portfolio and brand persists today and was a big focus at OpenWorld. But Fusion was announced in 2005, and became GA in 2011. That’s eight years ago. So in total, Fusion’s application architectural pattern is about 15 years old. How old is too old?

Are they old compared to on-premise products? Definitely not. Are they old compared to our largest SaaS competitor [Editor’s note: Salesforce]? No, that’s actually an older product.

Okay, now, just in a standalone way, is Fusion old? Well, I would say a lot of the technology is not old. We are updating to OCI, the latest infrastructure, we’ve moved our customers there. We are updating to the latest version of the Oracle database to an Autonomous Database. We’ve refreshed our UI once already, and in this conference, we announced the upcoming UI.

Now. If you go through every layer of the stack, and how it’s architected and how it’s built, you know, there’s some technical debt. It depends on what you mean by old.

We’re moving to more of a microservices architecture; we build that part a piece at a time. Once we get done with that, there’s going to be something else behind it. [Oracle CTO and chairman Larry Ellison] talked about serverless and elasticity of the cloud. We’re modifying the apps architecture to more fully leverage that.

So if the question is in hindsight, did we make mistakes? The biggest mistake for me personally is, look: We had a very large customer installed base across PeopleSoft Siebel, E-Business Suite, JD Edwards and the expectation from our customers, is when Oracle says we’ve got something, that they can move to it, and they can move to the cloud.

And so what we tried to do with Fusion V1, and one of the reasons it took us longer than anticipated is that we had this scope.

Any company now, it’s sort of cliche, they have this concept of minimum viable product. You introduce a product, and does it service all of the Oracle customer base? No. Will it serve a certain customer base? Sure, yeah. And then you get those customers and you add to it, you get more customers, you add to it, you improve it.

We had this vision of, let’s get a bigger and bigger scope. Had I done it over again? We’ve got a minimum viable product, we would announce it to a subset our customer and then some of this noise that you hear of like, oh, Oracle took too long, or Oracle’s late to markets or areas wouldn’t have been there.

I would argue in a lot of the areas, while it may have taken us longer to come to market, we came out with a lot more capabilities than our competitors right out the box, because we had a different mindset.

Oracle initially stressed how Fusion Applications could be run both on-premises and as SaaS, in part to ease customer concerns over the longer-term direction for Oracle applications. But most initial Fusion customers went with SaaS because running it on-premises was too complicated. Why did things play out that way?

While it may have taken us longer to come to market, we came out with a lot more capabilities than our competitors right out the box, because we had a different mindset.
Steve MirandaExecutive vice president of applications development, Oracle

I would take issue with the following: Let’s say we had the on-prem install, like, perfect. One button press, everything’s there. Do I think that we would have had a lot of uptake of Fusion on-premises as opposed SaaS? No. I think the SaaS model is better.

Did we optimize the on-premises install? No. We didn’t intentionally make it complicated. But, you know, we were focused on the SaaS market. We were [handling] the complexity. Was it perfect? No. Did that affect some customers? Yes. Did it affect the overall market? No, because I think SaaS was going to [win] anyway.

The classic debate for application customers and vendors is best-of-breed versus suites. Each approach has its own advantages and tradeoffs. Is this the status quo today, in SaaS? Has a third way emerged?

I don’t know if it’s a third way. We believe we have best-of-breed in many, many areas. Secondly, we believe in an integrated solution. Now let’s take that again. I view the customer as having three constituents they care about. They care about their own customers, they care about their employees and they care about their stakeholders, because public company, that’s shareholders, if it’s a private company, it’s different.

If you told me for any given company, there are two or five best-of-breed applications out for some niche feature that benefits one of those three audiences? OK. You go with it, no problem.

If you told me there were 20 or 50 best-of-breed options for a niche feature? It’s almost impossible for there to be that many niche features that matter to those three important people, particularly in areas where really we specialize in: ERP, supply chain, finance, HR, a lesser extent in CRM, slightly lesser in some parts of HR.

So this notion of “Oh, let’s best-of-breed everything.” Good luck. I mean, you could do it. But I don’t think you’re going to be happy because of the number of integrations. I don’t believe in that at all.

Let’s move forward to today. Apart from NetSuite in 2016, there haven’t been any mega-acquisitions in Oracle applications lately. Rather, it’s been around companies that play in the CX space, particularly ones focused on data collection and curation. What’s the thinking here?

Without data, you can automate a map, right? You can find out how to go from here to Palo Alto. No problem. You have in your phone, you can do directions, etc. But when you add data, and you turn on Waze, it gives you a different route, because you have real-time data, traffic alerts and road closures, it’s a lot more powerful.

And so we think real-time data matters, especially in CRM but also, frankly, in ERP. You might have a supplier and you have the other status, they go through an M&A, or other things. You want to have an ERP and CRM system that doesn’t ignore the outside world. You actually have data much more freely available today. You want to have a system that assumes that. So that’s our investment.

Oracle has recently drawn closer to Microsoft, forming a partnership around interoperability between Azure and Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. Microsoft is placing a big bet on Graph data connect, which pulls together information from its productivity software and customers’ internal business data. It seems like a place where your partnership could expand for mutual benefit.

I’m not going to answer that. I can’t comment on that. It’s a great question.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Seven ways to make your internship a success, even after it’s over – Microsoft Life

Nurture your connections

If you haven’t already, use LinkedIn to connect with all the people you worked with in a meaningful way during your time as an intern—your manager, other people on your team, employees you collaborated with in other parts of the company, and fellow interns. Make recommendations and give endorsements where appropriate—this is good professional etiquette, and it will also help you obtain those endorsements from others. If there are connections doing work that interests you, follow their progress and consider engaging with and sharing their content or updates.

In addition to strengthening your LinkedIn network, consider setting up an in-person or Skype check-in session with anyone who was particularly influential or impactful to you—a mentor, an advisor, or a manager. This will give you a chance to build the relationship.

Follow up on projects

Did you work on a project that taught you something valuable during your internship? Ask for an update after your internship ends. This shows the people who you worked with that you are interested and invested in the project’s outcome and success and that you value following up. It also gives you a reason to reach out, give them an update about what you are doing or working on, and perhaps nurture relationships that can help your career down the road. Also, learning what the outcome of the project was will help you incorporate the work you did into your resume and LinkedIn profile and allow you to tell the full story, including the impact of the work.

Showcase your work

Speaking of telling the full story . . . you put in the hard work, built new skills, and had a successful internship. Now you want to make sure that you showcase it so that others, such as recruiters and hiring managers, can clearly see your experience.

Before or soon after your internship is over, update your resume and LinkedIn profile to reflect the role. As you think about what you accomplished during your internship and frame it for your resume, include projects that you worked on, focus on transferable skills, incorporate appropriate terms and keywords, and put some thought into your social media presence.

Keep these tips in mind as you move through your internship adventure, and of course don’t forget to have fun!

Price drop! Cooler Master 700W PSU & Lide 210 Scanner

Cooler Master 700W PSU for sale.
This PSU is a couple of years old. It has worked fine no problems for me. No high pitched whine or any other issues. Has a connection for pretty much everything. Upgrading my pc for something a little more powerful so this good girl can go to a good home. Normally i don`t recommend 2nd hand psus, but she`s good and is just wasting space doing nothing (I already have a spare psu for testing).

£35 including postage.

LIDE 210 Scanner A4 size).
Love this…

Price drop! Cooler Master 700W PSU & Lide 210 Scanner

Price drop! Cooler Master 700W PSU & Lide 210 Scanner

Cooler Master 700W PSU for sale.
This PSU is a couple of years old. It has worked fine no problems for me. No high pitched whine or any other issues. Has a connection for pretty much everything. Upgrading my pc for something a little more powerful so this good girl can go to a good home. Normally i don`t recommend 2nd hand psus, but she`s good and is just wasting space doing nothing (I already have a spare psu for testing).

£35 including postage.

LIDE 210 Scanner A4 size).
Love this…

Price drop! Cooler Master 700W PSU & Lide 210 Scanner

For Sale – Asus RT-AC68U Router

Asus RT-AC68U used with my BT Fibre based connection. Has worked flawlessly. Sale only due to upgrade to MESH based wireless system. Original box with bits and pieces.

Full spec at link below :-

https://www.amazon.co.uk/ASUS-RT-AC68U-Dual-Band-Wireless-802-11AC/dp/B00FB45SI4

Price and currency: £75
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT or PPG
Location: Nailsea, Bristol
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Asus RT-AC68U Router

Asus RT-AC68U used with my BT Fibre based connection. Has worked flawlessly. Sale only due to upgrade to MESH based wireless system. Original box with bits and pieces.

Full spec at link below :-

https://www.amazon.co.uk/ASUS-RT-AC68U-Dual-Band-Wireless-802-11AC/dp/B00FB45SI4

Price and currency: £75
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT or PPG
Location: Nailsea, Bristol
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Asus USB AC56 wifi adapter

Hi, Asus USB AC56 wifi adapter for sale. I bought it off ebay and it worked great. But I don’t use it as it doesn’t allow wake on lan which i use all the time.

It is boxed with all the bits. Can be posted but would prefer collected in person from East London or central London (Victoria).

Thanks

Price and currency: £30
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Bank transfer or cash in person
Location: London
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Asus USB AC56 wifi adapter

Hi, Asus USB AC56 wifi adapter for sale. I bought it off ebay and it worked great. But I don’t use it as it doesn’t allow wake on lan which i use all the time.

It is boxed with all the bits. Can be posted but would prefer collected in person from East London or central London (Victoria).

Thanks

Price and currency: £30
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Bank transfer or cash in person
Location: London
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Asus USB AC56 wifi adapter

Hi, Asus USB AC56 wifi adapter for sale. I bought it off ebay and it worked great. But I don’t use it as it doesn’t allow wake on lan which i use all the time.

It is boxed with all the bits. Can be posted but would prefer collected in person from East London or central London (Victoria).

Thanks

Price and currency: £30
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Bank transfer or cash in person
Location: London
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.