Tag Archives: wouldnt

How to Create Automated Hyper-V Performance Reports

Wouldn’t it be nice to periodically get an automatic performance review of your Hyper-V VMs? Well, this blog post shows you how to do exactly that.

Hyper-V Performance Counters & Past Material

Over the last few weeks, I’ve been working with Hyper-V performance counters and PowerShell, developing new reporting tools. I thought I’d write about Hyper-V Performance counters here until I realized I already have.
https://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/performance-counters-hyper-v-and-powershell-part-1/
https://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/hyper-v-performance-counters-and-powershell-part-2/
Even though I wrote these articles several years ago, nothing has really changed. If you aren’t familiar with Hyper-V performance counters I encourage you to take a few minutes and read these. Otherwise, some of the material in this article might not make sense.

Get-CimInstance

Normally, using Get-Counter is a better approach, especially if you want to watch performance over a given timespan. But sometimes you just want a quick point in time snapshot. Or you may have network challenges. As far as I can tell Get-Counter uses legacy networking protocols, i.e. RPC and DCOM. This does not make them very firewall friendly. You could use PowerShell Remoting and Invoke-Command to run Get-Counter on the remote server. Or you can use Get-CimInstance which is what I want to cover in this article.

When you run Get-Counter, you are actually querying performance counter classes in WMI. This means you can get the same information using Get-CimInstance, or Get-WmiObject. But because we want to leverage WSMan and PowerShell Remoting, we’ll stick with the former.

Building a Hyper-V Performance Report

First, we need to identify the counter classes. I’ll focus on the classes that have “cooked” or formatted data.

I’m setting a variable for the computername so that you can easily re-use the code. I’m demonstrating this on a Windows 10 desktop running Hyper-V but you can just as easily point $Computer to a Hyper-V host.

It is pretty easy to leverage the PowerShell pipeline and create a report for all Hyper-V performance counters.

The text file will list each performance counter class followed by all instances of that class. If you run this code, you’ll see there are a number of properties that won’t have any values. It might help to filter those out. Here’s a snippet of code that is a variation on the text file. This code creates an HTML report, skipping properties that likely will have no value.

This code creates an HTML report using fragments. I also am dynamically deciding to create a table or a list based on the number of properties.

HTML Performance Counter Report

Thus far I’ve been creating reports for all performance counters and all instances. But you might only be interested in a single virtual machine. This is a situation where you can take advantage of WMI filtering.

In looking at the output from all classes, I can see that the Name property on these classes can include the virtual machine name as part of the value. So I will go through every class and filter only for instances that contain the name of VM I want to monitor.

This example also adds a footer to the report showing when it was created.

HTML Performance Report for a Single VM

It doesn’t take much more effort to create a report for each virtual machine. I turned my code into the beginning of a usable PowerShell function, designed to take pipeline input.

With this function, I can query as many virtual machines and create a performance report for each.

You can take this idea a step further and run this as a PowerShell scheduled job, perhaps saving the report files to an internal team web server.

I have at least one other intriguing PowerShell technique for working with Hyper-V performance counters, but I think I’ve given you enough to work with for today so I’ll save it until next time.

Wrap-Up

Did you find this useful? Have you done something similar and used a different method? Let us know in the comments section below!

Thanks for Reading!

Wanted – Gaming Mouse (Logitech Preferred)

I wouldn’t mind a G500 (even though they’re a good few years old), or a newer mouse – I’ll consider any mouse to be fair.

Location: North Lincolnshire

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Dell Latitude 3540 (i5, 8GB Ram, AMD Graphics)

Hi mate am looking at getting a laptop for somebody so just a few questions if you wouldnt mind answering them please?

– from the photos it looks in decent nick, are there any dents, marks or scratches on it at all including the screen?

– how long does the battery hold charge?

– does it come with box/charger?

-does it have webcam/hdmi out?

– how many usb ports does it have?

– Any issues with keyboard or any of the keys?

– will it come with windows installed?

– it’ll mainly be used for streaming video/internet browsing, word processing and uploading videos/vlogging, would it struggle with any of those tasks in your opinion?

I think thats about it! Apologies for the questions but not very computer savvy so my apologies if I;’ve asked any very obvious questions.

Thanks

Saf