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For Sale – EVGA 650 Watt GQ Gold Semi Modular PSU

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EVGA 650 Watt GQ Gold Hybrid Modular

Semi Modular PSU, has had about 2 weeks worth of usage so nice and clean.

unfortunately I dont have the box anymore so what you see is what you get (Check Pics)

Location
Caterham
Price and currency
£45
Delivery cost included
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For Sale – Dell 9370 i7 FHD, Dell 7590 i7 UHD touch, Alienware m15 r1 GTX 1070

Hi Adam

Your answer sort of tipped your hand, I’d be a fair way below what you’re asking so if you think the current price is keen we’ll be too far apart.

It sort of solves a problem for me as I’d prefer the 8 core one, even if I have to wait a few months to find one (paitent and frugal are my middle names).

Have a good NY and GLWS

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How to navigate a ransomware recovery process

If your defenses and backups fail despite your best efforts, your ransomware recovery effort can take one of several paths to restore normalcy to your organization.

Ransomware is bad enough. Don’t rush to bring systems and workloads back online and cause additional problems. The first item on your agenda is to take inventory of what still functions and what needs repairs. This has to be done quickly, but without mistakes. Management will want to know what needs to be done, but you can’t give a report until you have a full understanding. While you don’t need to break down every single server, you will need to have everything categorized. Think Active Directory, file servers, backups, networking infrastructure, email and communication, and production servers to start.

Take stock of the situation

The list of affected systems and VMs won’t be comprehensive. You have to start with machines that are a priority, and production servers are not in this case. If Active Directory is down, then it’s a safe bet most of your production servers — and the IT infrastructure — won’t be running correctly even if they weren’t directly affected.

To start with a ransomware recovery effort, check your backups first before anywhere else. Too many folks have deleted encrypted VMs only to find the malware wiped out their backup systems and end up going from bad to worse. Mistakes happen when you rush.

A somewhat easy path of restoring servers does exist if your backups are intact, current and operational. The restoration process needs to be tested before you delete any VMs. Rather than removing affected machines, try relocating them to lower-tier storage, external storage or even local storage on a host. Your goal is to get the encrypted VMs out of the way to give yourself space to work, then try the restores and get the VMs running before you remove their encrypted counterpart.

It might be time to make difficult choices

If the attack corrupted your backup system or the ransomware recovery effort failed, then someone above your pay grade will have to make some decisions. You will have to have a few difficult conversations, partly because the responsibility of the backups — and their reliability — rested on you. It’s possible it’s not entirely your fault for different reasons, such as not getting proper funding. This will have to be a conversation for a later time. At the moment, it’s time to make a decision: Pay the ransom, rebuild the systems or file a report.

Reporting requires the involvement of senior management and the company legal team. If you work for a government entity or public company, then you might have very specific guidelines that you must follow for legal reasons. If you work for a private company, then you still have possible legal issues with your customers about what you can and cannot disclose. No matter what you say, it will not be taken well. You want to be honest with your customers, but you also need to be mindful and limit how much data you share publicly.

The other aspect to reporting involves the authorities. Your organization might not even have been the intended target if you were hit by an older ransomware variant. If that’s the case, it’s possible there might be a decryption tool. It’s a long shot, but something worth check before you rebuild from scratch.

While distasteful, paying the ransomware is also an option. You need to consider how much will it cost to rebuild and recover versus handing over the ransom. It’s not an easy call to make because a payment does not come with any guarantees.

Most companies that pay the ransom typically don’t disclose that they paid or that they were even attacked. I suspect most organizations get their data unlocked, otherwise the ransomware business model would collapse.

The challenge with rebuilding is the effort involved. There are relatively few companies that have people who fully understand how every aspect of their environments work. Many IT infrastructures are the combined result of in-house experts and outside consultants. People install systems and take that knowledge with them when they leave. Their replacements learn how to keep these systems online, but that is very different from installing or building them from scratch. Repairing Active Directory is a challenge, but to rebuild an Active Directory with thousands of users and groups with permissions from documentation — with any luck — is next to impossible unless you have a lot of time and expertise.

Recovering from a ransomware attack is not an easy task, because not every situation is identical. If your defenses and backup recovery fail, the reconstruction effort will not be easy or cheap. You will either have to pay the ransom or spend money in overtime and consultants to rebuild mission-critical systems. Chances are your customers will find out what is happening during this recovery process, so you’ll have to have a communication plan and a single point of contact for the sake of consistency.

Ransomware isn’t something just for the IT department to handle; the decisions and the road to recovery will involve several stakeholders and real costs. Plan ahead and map out your steps to avoid rushing into bad choices that can’t be reversed.

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Using wsusscn2.cab to find missing Windows updates

Keeping your Windows Server and Windows desktop systems updated can be tricky, and finding missing patches in conventional ways might not be reliable.

There are a few reasons why important security patches might not get installed. They could be mistakenly declined in Windows Server Update Services or get overlooked in environments that a lack an internet connection.

Microsoft provides a Windows Update offline scan file, also known as wsusscn2.cab, to help you check Windows systems for missing updates. The CAB file contains information about most patches for Windows and Microsoft applications distributed through Windows Update.

The challenge with the wsusscn2.cab file is its size. It weighs in around 650 MB, and distributing it to all the servers to perform a scan can be tricky and time-consuming. This tutorial explains how to avoid those issues and run it on all of your servers in a secure and timely manner using IIS for file transfer instead of SMB or PowerShell sessions.

Requirements for offline scanning

There are some simple requirements to use this tutorial:

  • a server or PC running Windows Server 2012 or newer or Windows 10;
  • a domain account with local administrator on the servers you want to scan; and
  • PowerShell remoting enabled on the servers you want to scan.

Step 1. Install IIS

First, we need a web server we can use to distribute the wsusscn2.cab file. There are several ways to copy the file, but they all have different drawbacks.

For example, we could distribute the wsusscn2.cab file with a regular file share, but that requires a double-hop. You could also copy the wsusscn2.cab file over a PowerShell session, but that causes a lot of overhead and is extremely slow for large files. An easier and more secure way to distribute the file is through HTTP and IIS.

Installing on Windows Server

Start PowerShell as admin and type the following to install IIS:

Install-WindowsFeature -name Web-Server -IncludeManagementTools

Installing on Windows 10

Start PowerShell as an admin and type the following to install IIS:

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName IIS-WebServer

The IIS role should be installed. The default site will point to the root folder of the C drive.

We can now proceed to download wsusscn2.cab from Microsoft.

Step 2. Download wsusscn2.cab

The link for this file can be tricky to find. You can either download it from this link and save it to the C drive or run the following script as admin on the IIS server:

# Default Site path, change if necessary
$IISFolderPath = "C:inetpubwwwroot"

# Download wsusscn2.cab
Start-BitsTransfer -Source "http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=74689" -Destination "$IISFolderPathwsusscn2.cab"

The script downloads the file to the wwwroot folder. We can verify the download by browsing to http:///wsusscn2.cab.

You also need to get the hash value of wsusscn2.cab to verify it. After saving it, run the following PowerShell command to check the file hash:

(Get-FileHash C:inetpubwwwrootwsusscn2.cab).Hash

31997CD01B8790CA68A02F3A351F812A38639FA49FEC7346E28F7153A8ABBA05

Step 3. Run the check on a server

Next, you can use a PowerShell script to download and scan for missing updates on a PC or server using the wsusscn2.cab file. You can run the script on at least Windows Server 2008 or newer to avoid compatibility issues. To do this in a secure and effective manner over HTTP, we get the file hash of the downloaded wsusscn2.cab file and compare it with the file hash of the CAB file on the IIS server.

We can also use the file hash to see when Microsoft releases a new version of wsusscn2.cab.

Copy and save the following script as Get-MissingUpdates.ps1:

Param(
    [parameter(mandatory)]
    [string]$FileHash,

    [parameter(mandatory)]
    [string]$Wsusscn2Url
)


Function Get-Hash($Path){
    
    $Stream = New-Object System.IO.FileStream($Path,[System.IO.FileMode]::Open) 
    
    $StringBuilder = New-Object System.Text.StringBuilder 
    $HashCreate = [System.Security.Cryptography.HashAlgorithm]::Create("SHA256").ComputeHash($Stream)
    $HashCreate | Foreach {
        $StringBuilder.Append($_.ToString("x2")) | Out-Null
    }
    $Stream.Close() 
    $StringBuilder.ToString() 
}

$DataFolder = "$env:ProgramDataWSUS Offline Catalog"
$CabPath = "$DataFolderwsusscn2.cab"

# Create download dir
mkdir $DataFolder -Force | Out-Null

# Check if cab exists
$CabExists = Test-Path $CabPath


# Compare hashes if download is needed
if($CabExists){
    Write-Verbose "Comparing hashes of wsusscn2.cab"
    
    $HashMatch = $Hash -ne (Get-Hash -Path $CabPath)

    if($HashMatch){   
        Write-Warning "Filehash of $CabPath did not match $($FileHash) - downloading"
        Remove-Item $CabPath -Force
    }
    Else{
        Write-Verbose "Hashes matched"
    }
}

# Download wsus2scn.cab if it dosen't exist or hashes mismatch
if(!$CabExists -or $HashMatch -eq $false){
    Write-Verbose "Downloading wsusscn2.cab"
    # Works on Windows Server 2008 as well
    (New-Object System.Net.WebClient).DownloadFile($Wsusscn2Url, $CabPath)

    if($Hash -ne (Get-Hash -Path $CabPath)){
        Throw "$CabPath did not match $($FileHash)"
    }

}

Write-Verbose "Checking digital signature of wsusscn2.cab"

$CertificateIssuer = "CN=Microsoft Code Signing PCA, O=Microsoft Corporation, L=Redmond, S=Washington, C=US"
$Signature = Get-AuthenticodeSignature -FilePath $CabPath
$SignatureOk = $Signature.SignerCertificate.Issuer -eq $CertificateIssuer -and $Signature.Status -eq "Valid"


If(!$SignatureOk){
    Throw "Signature of wsusscn2.cab is invalid!"
}


Write-Verbose "Creating Windows Update session"
$UpdateSession = New-Object -ComObject Microsoft.Update.Session
$UpdateServiceManager  = New-Object -ComObject Microsoft.Update.ServiceManager 

$UpdateService = $UpdateServiceManager.AddScanPackageService("Offline Sync Service", $CabPath, 1) 

Write-Verbose "Creating Windows Update Searcher"
$UpdateSearcher = $UpdateSession.CreateUpdateSearcher()  
$UpdateSearcher.ServerSelection = 3
$UpdateSearcher.ServiceID = $UpdateService.ServiceID.ToString()
 
Write-Verbose "Searching for missing updates"
$SearchResult = $UpdateSearcher.Search("IsInstalled=0")

$Updates = $SearchResult.Updates

$UpdateSummary = [PSCustomObject]@{

    ComputerName = $env:COMPUTERNAME    
    MissingUpdatesCount = $Updates.Count
    Vulnerabilities = $Updates | Foreach {
        $_.CveIDs
    }
    MissingUpdates = $Updates | Select Title, MsrcSeverity, @{Name="KBArticleIDs";Expression={$_.KBArticleIDs}}
}

Return $UpdateSummary

Run the script on one of the servers of computers to check for missing updates. To do this, copy the script to the machine and run the script with the URL to the wsusscn2.cab on the IIS server and the hash value from step two:

PS51> Get-MissingUpdates.ps1 -Wsusscn2Url "http://
  
   /wsusscn2.cab" -FileHash 31997CD01B8790CA68A02F3A351F812A38639FA49FEC7346E28F7153A8ABBA05
  

If there are missing updates, you should see output similar to the following:

ComputerName     MissingUpdatesCount Vulnerabilities  MissingUpdates
------------     ------------------- ---------------  --------------
UNSECURESERVER                    14 {CVE-2006-4685, CVE-2006-4686,
CVE-2019-1079, CVE-2019-1079...} {@{Title=MSXML 6.0 RTM Security Updat

If the machine is not missing updates, then you should see this type of output:

ComputerName MissingUpdatesCount Vulnerabilities MissingUpdates
------------ ------------------- --------------- --------------
SECURESERVER                   0

The script gives a summary of the number of missing updates, what those updates are and the vulnerabilities they patch.

This process is a great deal faster than searching for missing updates online. But this manual method is not efficient when checking a fleet of servers, so let’s learn how to run the script on all systems and collect the output.

Step 4. Run the scanning script on multiple servers at once

The easiest way to collect missing updates from all servers with PowerShell is with a PowerShell job. The PowerShell jobs run in parallel on all computers, and you can fetch the results.

On a PC or server, save the file from the previous step to the C drive — or another directory of your choice — and run the following as a user with admin permissions on your systems:

# The servers you want to collect missing updates from
$Computers = @(
        'server1',
        'server2',
        'server3'
)

# These are the arguments that will be sent to the remote servers
$RemoteArgs = @(
    # File hash from step 2
    "31997CD01B8790CA68A02F3A351F812A38639FA49FEC7346E28F7153A8ABBA05",
    "http://$env:COMPUTERNAME/wsusscn2.cab"
)

$Params = @{
    ComputerName = $Computers
    ArgumentList = $RemoteArgs
    AsJob        = $True
    # Filepath to the script on the server/computer you are running this command on
    FilePath = "C:ScriptsGet-MissingUpdates.ps1"
    # Maximum number of active jobs
    ThrottleLimit = 20
}

$Job = Invoke-Command @Params

# Wait for all jobs to finish
$Job | Wait-Job

# Collect Results from the jobs
$Results = $Job | Receive-Job

# Show results
$Results

This runs the Get-MissingUpdates.ps1 script on all servers in the $Computers variable in parallel to save time and make it easier to collect the results.

You should run these PowerShell jobs regularly to catch servers with a malfunctioning Windows Update and to be sure important updates get installed.

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For Sale – Apple MacBook Pro 13.3″ Latest Edition 2019

@tt01, bearing in mind the comments from your previous thread, I suggest you are transparent with this listing, answering all questions with as much detail as possible. Rousetafarian requested a copy of the receipt which you should post here (omitting personal details). The reason being; you are a new member with no verifiable history, selling an extremely high-value item on the basis of trust.

Thank you.

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Employing data science, new research uncovers clues behind unexplainable infant death – Microsoft on the Issues

Imagine losing your child in their first year of life and having no idea what caused it. This is the heartbreaking reality for thousands of families each year who lose a child to Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID). Despite decades-long efforts to prevent SUID, it remains the leading cause of death for children between one month and one year of age in developed nations. In the U.S. alone, 3,600 children die unexpectedly of SUID each year.

For years, researchers hypothesized that infants who died due to SUID in the earliest stages of the life differed from those dying of SUID later. Now, for the first time, we know, thanks to the single largest study ever undertaken on the subject, this is statistically the case.

Working in collaboration with Tatiana Anderson and Jan-Marino Ramirez at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and Edwin Mitchell at University of Auckland, we analyzed the Center for Disease Control (CDC) data on every child born in the U.S. over a decade, including over 41 million births and 37,000 SUID deaths. We compared all possible groups by the age at the time of death to understand if these populations were different.”

In our study published today in Pediatrics, a leading pediatric journal, we found that SUID deaths during the first week of life, were statistically different from all other SUID deaths that occur between the first week and first year of life. SUID cases in the first week of life have been called SUEND, which stands for Sudden Unexpected Early Neonatal Death. We have called SUID deaths between 7-364 days postperinatal SUID.

The two groups – SUEND and postperinatal SUID – differed by several factors such as birth order, maternal age and marital status. For postperinatal deaths, the risk of SUID progressively while the opposite was true for SUEND deaths where firstborn children were more at risk. Postperinatal SUID rates were higher for unmarried, young mothers (between 15-24 years old) at birth, while unmarried, young mothers of the same age showed a decreased risk of SUEND death. The two groups also had different distributions of birthweight and pregnancy length.

Our study concluded that SUID deaths in the first week differed from postperinatal SUID deaths and that the two groups should be considered separately in future research. Considering these two as different causes may help uncover independent underlying physiological mechanisms and/or genetic factors.

This research is part of Microsoft’s AI for Good initiative, a $125 million five-year program where we utilize AI to help tackle some of the world’s greatest challenges and helping some of the world’s most vulnerable populations. For this research, we leveraged our machine learning, cloud-computing capabilities and advanced modelling techniques powered by AI to analyze the data.

By pairing our capabilities and data scientists with Seattle Children’s medical research expertise, we’re continuing to make progress on identifying the cause of SUID. Earlier this year, we published a study that estimated approximately 22% of SUID deaths in the U.S. were attributable to maternal cigarette-smoking during pregnancy, giving us further evidence that, through our collaboration with experts in varying disciplines, we are getting to the root of this problem and making remarkable advances.

We hope our progress in piecing together the SUID puzzle ultimately saves lives, and gives parents and researchers hope for the future.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Turning the next generation into everyday superheroes thanks to Hour of Code 2019 – Microsoft News Centre Europe

When you think of coding, your first thoughts might be about highly specialized technical know-how. But did you know that effective coding requires skills like creativity, innovation and collaboration too – all of which will be hugely important for the workforce of tomorrow?

According to Microsoft research with McKinsey, the fastest growing occupations, such as technology professionals and healthcare providers, will require a combination of digital and cognitive skills such as digital literacy, problem solving and critical thinking. Young people having access to learning tools to improve both these sets of skills is crucial – a fact non-profit organizations like JA Europe recognize through their work to get young people ready for the future of work. If young people are given the opportunity to develop their digital skills, the European Labor Market will see significant benefits when they move into the workforce. According to a LinkedIn Economic Graph report, AI Talent in the European Labour Market, training and upskilling ‘near-AI’ talent could double the size of the current AI workforce in the EU. It also found that AI skills are concentrated in a small number of countries and that this must be addressed to reduce the digital skills gap in Europe.

In conjunction with Computer Science Education Week which began yesterday and extends to December 15, Microsoft continues its multi-year commitment to Hour of Code, a global movement that introduces students to computer science and demystifies what coding is all about. Activities are running across Europe to fuel imagination and demonstrate how these skills could be used to solve some of the world’s biggest problems. As such, code has the power to turn anyone into an everyday superhero.

To bring this to life, Microsoft is inviting young people to ‘save the day’ through Computer Science. Created in partnership with MakeCode, a new Minecraft tutorial combines code, Artificial Intelligence and problem solving skills. It is inspired by various Microsoft AI for Earth projects and encourages students to use their critical thinking skills to plot where forest fires could happen, put plans in place to stop them with AI and ultimately save the Minecraft village!

Since 2012, Microsoft has helped more than 137,000 young people and educators in Europe through Hour of Code events and programs. And, as the end of the decade draws near, we are keen to support even more people to get into coding and show how it can change the world. If you’re looking to help your children or students become coding superheroes, we have developed two training guides – one for students and one aimed at educators – no cape needed!

Go forth and code!

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Author: Microsoft News Center

For Sale – Lamicall Tablet/iPad Silver Metal Stand & Lamicall MacBook Laptop Riser Stand *RRP £45*

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Lamicall Silver Metal Laptop Stand
Selling as silver doesn’t match my new Space Grey set-up, so selling to buy a new matching set!
About 6 months old and still in excellent condition. RRP £29.99 on Amazon and the only stand with 89 reviews, all at 5 star!

And

Lamicall Silver Adjustable Tablet Stand/Holder
About 12 months old and still in excellent condition. RRP £14.99 on Amazon and the only stand with over 1000 reviews, all at 5 star!
Location
Milton Keynes
Price and currency
25
Delivery cost included
Delivery is NOT included
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I prefer the goods to be collected
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For Sale – Dell XPS 15″ 9560 I7-7700hq 4K, 16gb RAM 512gb SSD

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Dell XPS 15″ 9560 I7-7700hq 4K 16gb RAM 512gb SSD Laptop. Condition is Used. Dispatched with eBay delivery – Packlink 1 day.

Samsung PM981 512gb SSD – One of the fastest on the market.
Intel 9260 WiFi – the killer WiFi that comes with these line of laptops has many issues, it has been replaced with an Intel 9260 which is one of the best / most reliable on the market.

You will receive:

  • The laptop described above
  • Official 130W Dell Charger
  • Original Box
Location
London
Price and currency
800
Delivery cost included
Delivery is NOT included
Prefer goods collected?
I have no preference
Advertised elsewhere?
Advertised elsewhere
Payment method
PPG / BT

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